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Paul Revere.jpg Marion and His Men Swooping Down on a British CampThumbnailsPaul Revere's RideMarion and His Men Swooping Down on a British CampThumbnailsPaul Revere's RideMarion and His Men Swooping Down on a British CampThumbnailsPaul Revere's Ride

Meanwhile General Gage, who was in command of 3,000 British troops in Boston, had received orders from England to seize John Hancock and Samuel Adams as traitors. General Gage knew that Hancock and Adams were staying for a while with a friend in Lexington. He had learned also through his spies that the minute-men had collected some cannon and military stores in Concord, eighteen miles from Boston. The British General planned, therefore, to send a body of troops to arrest the two leaders at Lexington, and then to push on and destroy the stores at Concord.

Although he acted with the greatest secrecy, he was not alert enough to keep his plans from the watchful minute-men. Gage's failure was brought about by one of these minute-men, Paul Revere, whose famous "midnight ride" was one of the exciting episodes of the Revolution.

Author
Project Gutenberg's American Leaders and Heroes, by Wilbur Fisk Gordy Published 1907
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