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Penns Treaty with the Indians

Penns Treaty with the Indians.jpg William PennThumbnailsPenn's Slate-roof House, PhiladelphiaWilliam PennThumbnailsPenn's Slate-roof House, PhiladelphiaWilliam PennThumbnailsPenn's Slate-roof House, Philadelphia

As we might expect from a man of his even temper and unselfish spirit, Penn treated the Indians with kindness and justice, and won their friendship from the first. Although he held the land by a grant from the King of England, still he wished to satisfy the natives by paying them for their claims to the land. Accordingly, he called a council under the spreading branches of a now famous elm-tree, where he met the red men as friends, giving them knives, kettles, axes, beads, and various other things in exchange for the land. He declared that[Pg 100] he was of the same flesh and blood as they; and highly pleased, the Indians in return declared that they would live in love with William Penn as long as the sun and moon should shine.

Author
Project Gutenberg's American Leaders and Heroes, by Wilbur Fisk Gordy Published 1907
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