4120/5942
Home / Albums /

A Chinese Tomb

A Chinese Tomb.jpg Open-air refreshment stallThumbnailsHow to hold the Cello bowOpen-air refreshment stallThumbnailsHow to hold the Cello bowOpen-air refreshment stallThumbnailsHow to hold the Cello bow

The number of Chinese going in the same direction as ourselves was very great, as the worshipping of the tombs had just begun. Most of these people were on foot, but some went along in chairs. They carried with them long strings of paper ingots, to burn at the tombs. These ingots, or mock-money, are done up like little sugar-loaves, and are strung on cord. I saw men carrying five or six such long strings of ingots from the end of their bamboos. They also had offerings of cake in red painted boxes, fire-crackers, and bright-coloured and white paper, the latter of which they stick in strips on the graves. I also saw some men carrying roasted pigs cooked whole, for offerings. The Chinese are too thrifty to leave these at the tombs ; they merely offer them, then bring them home and feast on them with their relations. All male members of a family must worship their ancestors' tombs yearly, and we met fathers taking their sons of all ages with them to the graves.
The tombs were soon on all sides of us ; they are in the form of a horse-shoe, and are built on the sides of the mountain in stone or asphalte. These belong to the rich ; the graves of the poorer class are simply marked by an upright stone or a conical mound of earth.

Author
Fourteen Months in Canton by Mrs. Gray Published 1880 Available from books.google.com
Keywords
19th Century, China, Death
Albums
Visits
376