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The Venice parachute (1617), after an engraving of the time

The Venice parachute (1617), after an engraving of the time.jpg Father Lana's aerial ship (1670)ThumbnailsPrinciple of the parachute, drawing by Leonardo da VinciFather Lana's aerial ship (1670)ThumbnailsPrinciple of the parachute, drawing by Leonardo da VinciFather Lana's aerial ship (1670)ThumbnailsPrinciple of the parachute, drawing by Leonardo da Vinci

The attached engraving is the exact reproduction of the parachute that the author also defines in the following terms, certainly inspired by those of Leonardo da Vinci:

With a square veil stretched out with four equal poles and having tied four ropes to the four quinces, a man without danger will be able to throw himself from the top of a tower or some other prominent place; because although, at the hour, there is no wind, the effort of he who falls will bring wind which will hold back the sail, lest it fall violently, but gradually descend. The man therefore must measure himself with the size of the sail.

Author
La Navigation Aérienne L'aviation Et La Direction Des Aérostats Dans Les Temps Anciens Et Modernes (Air Navigation Aviation And The Direction Of Aerostats In Ancient And Modern Time)
by Gaston Tissandier
Published in 1886
Available from gutenb
Keywords
Flight, Middle Ages
Visits
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