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The Cody Biplane

The Cody Biplane.jpg The Curtiss Biplane front viewThumbnailsThe Cody Biplane from aboveThe Curtiss Biplane front viewThumbnailsThe Cody Biplane from aboveThe Curtiss Biplane front viewThumbnailsThe Cody Biplane from above

Another ardent worker in England, and one destined to become famous, was Mr. S. F. Cody. After developing a system of man-lifting kites which the British War Office acquired, he joined the military aircraft factory that had been established at Farnborough. Here, after tests with dirigible balloons, he began the construction of experimental biplanes—all machines of large size. Early in 1909 he made brief flights—the longest being one of about 250 yards. Then, after alterations to his machine, he managed in July to fly a distance of 4 miles. This he increased afterwards to 8 miles; and then on 1st September flew for 1 hour 3 minutes, rising to a height of 300 feet. Cody’s biplane was a very large machine, having 1000 square feet of lifting surface—twice that of the Farman or Voisin. Driving it was an 80-h.p. engine, which operated two propellers on the system used by the Wrights. With its pilot on board the machine weighed 2170 lbs.

A. Elevating-planes and vertical-plane
B. Pilot’s control lever
C.C. Main-planes
D. Motor
E. Propellers
F. Rudder
G. Landing gear
H. Rear skid.