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Red Blood-Corpuscles presenting, some the Surfaces, others the Edges, of their Discs, together with Single Representatives of Four Types of Leucocyte.

Red Blood-Corpuscles.jpg Diagram showing the Relative Positions of the Organs of the Chest and Abdomen.ThumbnailsA Minute Portion of the Pulp of the SpleenDiagram showing the Relative Positions of the Organs of the Chest and Abdomen.ThumbnailsA Minute Portion of the Pulp of the SpleenDiagram showing the Relative Positions of the Organs of the Chest and Abdomen.ThumbnailsA Minute Portion of the Pulp of the SpleenDiagram showing the Relative Positions of the Organs of the Chest and Abdomen.ThumbnailsA Minute Portion of the Pulp of the SpleenDiagram showing the Relative Positions of the Organs of the Chest and Abdomen.ThumbnailsA Minute Portion of the Pulp of the SpleenDiagram showing the Relative Positions of the Organs of the Chest and Abdomen.ThumbnailsA Minute Portion of the Pulp of the Spleen
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A, the most common type, highly amœboid and phagocytic. Its protoplasm is finely granular, its nucleus multipartite.
B, a leucocyte closely similar to the last, but larger, and containing an undivided nucleus. It is shown with a cluster of particles of soot in its body-substance.
C, a young leucocyte, or “lymphocyte.”
D, a coarsely granular leucocyte. Its granules stain brightly with acid dyes—e.g., eosin or acid fuchsin.

Author
The Body at Work
by Alexander Hill
Published 1908
Available from gutenberg.org
Dimensions
900*848
Tags
human
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840
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51