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Door Fastenings

Door Fastenings.png A House without a gateThumbnailsA roofed and a pair gateA House without a gateThumbnailsA roofed and a pair gateA House without a gateThumbnailsA roofed and a pair gate

here is, however, still another element of insecurity in wooden houses. House-breaking is by no means difficult in Tokyo. In the daytime the front entrance is generally closed with sliding-doors which can, however, be gently opened and entered without attracting notice unless some one happens to be in an adjoining room. The kitchen door is usually kept open, and it is quite easy to sneak into the kitchen and make away with food or utensils. Tradesmen, rag-merchants, and hawkers come into the kitchen to ask for orders, to buy waste-paper or broken crockery, or to sell their wares, so that there is nothing unusual in finding strange men on the premises. Sometimes these hawkers are really burglars in disguise come to reconnoitre the house with a view to paying it a nocturnal visit. At night, of course, the house is shut and the doors are bolted or fastened with a ring and staple, but very seldom locked or chained.

Author
Home Life in Tokyo
Author: Jukichi Inouye
Published: 1910
Available from gutenberg.org
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