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The Porch - Open and Latticed

The Porch - Open and Latticed.jpg An eight-matted parlourThumbnailsA six-matted room and verandahAn eight-matted parlourThumbnailsA six-matted room and verandahAn eight-matted parlourThumbnailsA six-matted room and verandah

The smallest houses are those in the slums which have only three yards’ frontage and a depth of four yards. The entrance, the space for kitchen utensils and the sink, and perhaps a closet or cupboard would leave room for little more than three mats, on which the whole family live; but as children spend all their playtime outside and come in only for meals, it is at night that the house is crowded, and even then as they sleep higgledy-piggledy, a couple or so of children do not inconvenience their parents to any appreciable extent. A two-roomed house is common enough and is not confined to the slums. A childless old couple, when the wife has to do the household work, find such a house large enough for them. Artisans also live in them. Three-roomed houses, too, are very common. Houses built in blocks are oftenest of this size. They are made up of the porch, the sitting-room, and the parlour or drawing-room. These three rooms are the essential portions of a house; and larger houses merely add to them. A visitor calls at the porch, the paper sliding-door is opened, he is invited to come in, he leaves his hat and greatcoat in the porch, and enters the parlour.

Author
Home Life in Tokyo
Author: Jukichi Inouye
Published: 1910
Available from gutenberg.org
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