Free Public domain clipart for all your serious research needs
18/446
Home / Albums / Keyword America /

Captain John Smith’s Map of New England

Captain John Smith’s Map of New England.jpg Diagram of Curtiss Aeroplane, side viewThumbnailsSamuel de Champlain’s Map of Plymouth HarborDiagram of Curtiss Aeroplane, side viewThumbnailsSamuel de Champlain’s Map of Plymouth HarborDiagram of Curtiss Aeroplane, side viewThumbnailsSamuel de Champlain’s Map of Plymouth Harbor

The Pilgrims were familiar with Capt. John Smith’s account of a voyage in which he had surveyed the coast from Cape Cod to Penobscot Bay in 1614. He had even offered his services as guide and military captain, but Myles Standish got the job. Undoubtedly they did bring with them his Description of New England (London, 1616), in which the following map was published.

Capt. Smith, who had already gained some fame and fortune in Virginia, dedicated to Prince Charles this effort in which the term “New England” first appeared: “... it being my chance to range some other parts of America, whereof I here present your highness the description in a map, my humble suit [in original, “sure”] is you would please to change their barbarous names for such English, as posterity may say Prince Charles was their godfather.” Several English place-names were incorporated in the map, but posterity disregarded most of them, a noteworthy exception being “Plimouth.” Smith notes that the Indians called the site “... Accomack, an excellent good harbor, good land, and no want of any thing but industrious people,” recalling that “After much kindness, upon a small occasion we fought also with 40 or 50 of those [Indians]; though some were hurt and some slain, yet within an hour after, they became friends.”