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Dial of old clock

Dial of old clock.jpg Portrait of St. Francis Xavier, One of the Earliest Missionaries to JapanThumbnailsTheodor MommsenPortrait of St. Francis Xavier, One of the Earliest Missionaries to JapanThumbnailsTheodor MommsenPortrait of St. Francis Xavier, One of the Earliest Missionaries to JapanThumbnailsTheodor MommsenPortrait of St. Francis Xavier, One of the Earliest Missionaries to JapanThumbnailsTheodor MommsenPortrait of St. Francis Xavier, One of the Earliest Missionaries to JapanThumbnailsTheodor MommsenPortrait of St. Francis Xavier, One of the Earliest Missionaries to JapanThumbnailsTheodor Mommsen
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The Japanese division of time is peculiar. The day, from the beginning of morning twilight to the end of evening twilight, is divided into six hours, and the night, from the beginning to the end of darkness, into six other hours. Of course the length of these hours is constantly varying. Their names (according to Titsingh) are as follows: Kokonotsu [nine], noon, and midnight; Yatsu [eight], about our two o’clock; Nanatsu [seven], from four to five; Mutsu [six], end of the evening and commencement of morning twilight; Itsutsu [five], eight to nine; Yotsu [four], about ten; and then Kokonotsu again. Each of these hours is also subdivided into four parts, thus: Kokonotsu, noon or midnight; Kokonotsu-han [nine and a half], quarter past; Kokonotsu-han-sugi [past nine and a half], half past; Kokonotsu-han-sugi-maye [before past nine and a half], three quarters past; commencement of second hour: Yatsu-han, etc., and so through all the hours.

Author
Hildreth's "Japan as it was and is", Volume I (of 2)
A Handbook of Old Japan
By Richard Hildreth
Published in 1906
Available from gutenberg.org
Dimensions
900*773
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