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A watchers’ stage

A watchers’ stage.jpg My grandmother Turtle made scarecrows to frighten away the birdsThumbnailsAt one side of our field Turtle had made a boothMy grandmother Turtle made scarecrows to frighten away the birdsThumbnailsAt one side of our field Turtle had made a boothMy grandmother Turtle made scarecrows to frighten away the birdsThumbnailsAt one side of our field Turtle had made a booth

Many families now built stages in their fields, where the girls and young women of the household came to sit and sing as they watched that crows and other thieves did not steal the ripening grain.

A watchers’ stage was not hard to build. Four posts, forked at the tops, upheld beams, on which was laid a floor of puncheons, or split small logs, at the height of the full grown corn. The floor was about four feet long by three wide, roomy enough for two girls to sit together comfortably. Often a soft robe was spread on the floor. A ladder made of the trunk of a tree rested against the stage. The ladder had three steps.

Author
Waheenee--An Indian Girl's Story
By Waheenee
as told to Gilbert Livingstone Wilson
Illustrator: Frederick N. Wilson
Published in 1921
Available from gutenberg.org
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