Home

Free Public domain clipart for all your serious research needs

55/689
Home / Albums / Keyword America /

Learning to work

Learning to work.jpg The harness was of two pieces - a collar, to go around the dog’s neckThumbnailsThey saw two great fires sweeping toward them over the prairieThe harness was of two pieces - a collar, to go around the dog’s neckThumbnailsThey saw two great fires sweeping toward them over the prairieThe harness was of two pieces - a collar, to go around the dog’s neckThumbnailsThey saw two great fires sweeping toward them over the prairie

My mothers began to teach me household tasks when I was about twelve years old. “You are getting to be a big girl,” they said. “Soon you will be a woman, and marry. Unless you learn to work, how will you feed your family?”

One of the things given me to do was fetching water from the river. No spring was near our village; and, anyhow, our prairie springs are often bitter with alkali. But the Missouri river, fed by melting snows of the Montana mountains, gave us plenty of fresh water. Missouri river water is muddy; but it soon settles, and is cool and sweet to drink. We Indians love our big river, and we are glad to drink of its waters, as drank our fathers.

Author
Waheenee--An Indian Girl's Story
By Waheenee
as told to Gilbert Livingstone Wilson
Illustrator: Frederick N. Wilson
Published in 1921
Available from gutenberg.org
Visits
33
Downloads
0