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Divining rod

Divining rod.jpg Vena profundaThumbnailsHildegard receiving the light from HeavenVena profundaThumbnailsHildegard receiving the light from HeavenVena profundaThumbnailsHildegard receiving the light from Heaven

There are many great contentions between miners concerning the forked twig, for some say that it is of the greatest use in discovering veins, and others deny it. Some of those who manipulate and use the twig, first cut a fork from a hazel bush with a knife, for this bush they consider more efficacious than any other for revealing the veins, especially if the hazel bush grows above a vein. Others use a different kind of twig for each metal, when they are seeking to discover the veins, for they employ hazel twigs for veins of silver; ash twigs for copper; pitch pine for lead and especially tin, and rods made of iron and steel for gold. All alike grasp the forks of the twig with their hands, clenching their fists, it being necessary that the clenched fingers should be held toward the sky in order that the twig should be raised at that end where the two branches meet. Then they wander hither and thither at random through mountainous regions. It is said that the moment they place their feet on a vein the twig immediately turns and twists, and so by its action discloses the vein; when they move their feet again and go away from that spot the twig becomes once more immobile.

Author
De Re Metallica
Translated from the First Latin Edition of 1556 By Georgius Agricola
Translated by Herbert Clark Hoover and Lou Henry Hoover
Published in 1950
Available from www.gutenberg.org
Keywords
16th Century, Mining
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