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Larva of a flesh fly (Sarcophaga) - Caudal aspect - Anterior stigmata. Pharyngeal skeleton

Larva of a flesh fly (Sarcophaga) - Caudal aspect - Anterior stigmata. Pharyngeal skeleton.jpg The house or typhoid fly (Musca domestica)ThumbnailsDermatophilus penetransThe house or typhoid fly (Musca domestica)ThumbnailsDermatophilus penetransThe house or typhoid fly (Musca domestica)ThumbnailsDermatophilus penetransThe house or typhoid fly (Musca domestica)ThumbnailsDermatophilus penetransThe house or typhoid fly (Musca domestica)ThumbnailsDermatophilus penetransThe house or typhoid fly (Musca domestica)ThumbnailsDermatophilus penetrans
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Sarcophagidæ—The larvæ of flies of this family usually feed upon meats, but have been found in cheese, oleomargerine, pickled herring, dead and living insects, cow dung and human feces. Certain species are parasitic in insects. Higgins (1890) reported an instance of "hundreds" of larvæ of Sarcophaga being vomited by a child eighteen months of age. There was no doubt as to their origin for they were voided while the physician was in the room. There are many other reports of their occurrence in the alimentary canal. We have recorded elsewhere (Riley, 1906) a case in which some ten or twelve larvæ of Sarcophaga were found feeding on the diseased tissues of a malignant tumor. The tumor, a melanotic sarcoma, was about the size of a small walnut, and located in the small of the back of an elderly lady.

Author
Handbook of Medical Entomology
By William Albert Riley and Oskar Augustus Johanssen
Published in 1915
Available from gutenberg.org
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1214*718
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