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The house or typhoid fly (Musca domestica)

The house or typhoid fly (Musca domestica).jpg Stomoxys calcitrans - adult, larva, puparium and detailsThumbnailsLarva of a flesh fly (Sarcophaga) - Caudal aspect - Anterior stigmata. Pharyngeal skeletonStomoxys calcitrans - adult, larva, puparium and detailsThumbnailsLarva of a flesh fly (Sarcophaga) - Caudal aspect - Anterior stigmata. Pharyngeal skeletonStomoxys calcitrans - adult, larva, puparium and detailsThumbnailsLarva of a flesh fly (Sarcophaga) - Caudal aspect - Anterior stigmata. Pharyngeal skeletonStomoxys calcitrans - adult, larva, puparium and detailsThumbnailsLarva of a flesh fly (Sarcophaga) - Caudal aspect - Anterior stigmata. Pharyngeal skeletonStomoxys calcitrans - adult, larva, puparium and detailsThumbnailsLarva of a flesh fly (Sarcophaga) - Caudal aspect - Anterior stigmata. Pharyngeal skeletonStomoxys calcitrans - adult, larva, puparium and detailsThumbnailsLarva of a flesh fly (Sarcophaga) - Caudal aspect - Anterior stigmata. Pharyngeal skeleton
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The house-fly breeds by preference in horse manure. Indeed, It has been found that they would develop in almost any fermenting organic substance. Thus, they have been bred from pig, chicken, and cow manure, dirty waste paper, decaying vegetation, decaying meat, slaughter-house refuse, sawdust-sweepings, and many other sources. A fact which makes them especially dangerous as disease-carriers is that they breed readily in human excrement.

Author
Handbook of Medical Entomology
By William Albert Riley and Oskar Augustus Johanssen
Published in 1915
Available from gutenberg.org
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