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Cardiff Castle, Glamorgan

Cardiff Castle, Glamorgan.jpg Château-Gaillard, PlanThumbnailsCaerphilly Castle, Ground planChâteau-Gaillard, PlanThumbnailsCaerphilly Castle, Ground planChâteau-Gaillard, PlanThumbnailsCaerphilly Castle, Ground plan

THE castle of Cardiff, though not unknown to border fame, has been the theatre of no great historical event, nor does it present any very striking peculiarities of position, scenery, or structure. Its claim to more than local interest rests upon the character and fortunes of the great barons whose inheritance and occasional residence it was from the 11th to the 15th century, from the reign of Rufus to that of Henry VI. Probably a Roman castrum, and certainly a hold of the local British princes, it was won, in 1090, by the sword of Robert Fitzhamon, lord of the Honour of Gloucester, and by him constituted the “caput” of his newly acquired seignory of Morgan and Glamorgan.

Author
Mediæval Military Architecture in England
By George Thomas Clark
Published 1884
Available from gutenberg.org
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